XXXV: Dawn


To those who may be receiving one of these post-notifications for the first time: This is not a blog; it’s actually part of a book, and will make little sense to you without knowledge of what has come before—which you can easily obtain, along with a goodly amount of satirical theatre as matters progress, by simply entering ttgftyri.org into your web browser, opening the menu, and starting at page one. J.J.


Scene 14

And indeed, while looking about at all the adoring faces in the crowd that evening, Gaim decides that this last Tree should grow two new branches!

First, a temple consecrated to Our Lady of Mercy—a new aspect of the Great Mother who might at minimum offer simple comfort to the barren, miserably ill, or sorely heartbroken—would now be built down on Temple Row, complete with attendant priestesses and a suitable effigy of her before which visitors might implore her aid.

And then, another consecrated to Our Lady of Charity—whose temple would chiefly be supported by his wealthier followers who’d expressed some desire to participate at least a little in all this ‘succoring’ business, either because they had excess wealth to give away or because they felt a little guilty about their sometimes obscene riches in the face of people who were no longer able to afford the growing number of temple sacrifices that were required these days, if to even buy food for themselves; and who’d accordingly never turn anyone away from the Ultimate Nipple of it all feeling hungry, dirty, tired, sick, or stupid—much less divinely abandoned.

And turning to his Official Project Coordinator, he commands that it be done.

* * *

But then as time passed, word got back to him that people were no longer adoring him as the Gardener who’d brought forth order from the primordial jungle of Mother-cults and ultimately created the world’s ‘first great civilization’, but even better, were beginning to refer to that civilization as his ‘Child’—a male Child, naturally.

And then, as necessarily the Child of the Great Mother too; with him as simply the Father—though of course, not in the usual sense.

Scene 15

Nonetheless, as Gaim gradually grows older walking to and fro in his Garden—lord of all that he surveys, and basking in the whole world’s adulation—he becomes sufficiently conscious of his own mortality as to realize that someday soon, he’s going to have to turn his beloved Tree over to another!

And so his thoughts inevitably turn to choosing and grooming a successor, as his final act of control before departure.

But then, who?

* * *

And meanwhile—wouldn’t you know it—a new problem appears to be developing.

For lately, Princess Dawn—by now, well into her teens—has begun acting a little strange.

Oh, not just the usual adolescent stuff—impatient with her mother’s control, jealousy of her older sister the Princess-in-waiting and all that—but rather, for some time now she’s been commenting on the strong resemblance between herself and him!

Moreover, she’s been making all these half-finished, unnerving remarks about how she’ll soon ‘prove’ something to everybody, but especially to her mother and him—and no doubt to her new boyfriend, one Adum.

Nor will she say any more about it—even when exasperatedly invited to by all concerned.

Rather, she’ll just stare back at them with these helpless, frightened eyes: seemingly unable to bring forth another word, lest—oh well, undoubtedly something or other. 

Anyway, Gaim has decided that this might be a good time for him to go abroad in the land in search of that successor.

And why not—after all, the world has been under his absolute control now for nigh on a generation.

So what could possibly go wrong?


But then, who?

* * *

And meanwhile—wouldn’t you know it—a new problem appears to be developing.

For lately, Princess Dawn—by now, well into her teens—has begun acting a little strange.

Oh, not just the usual adolescent stuff—impatient with her mother’s control, jealousy of her older sister the Princess-in-waiting and all that—but rather, for some time now she’s been commenting on the strong resemblance between herself and him!

Moreover, she’s been making all these half-finished, unnerving remarks about how she’ll soon ‘prove’ something to everybody, but especially to her mother and him—and no doubt to her new boyfriend, one Adum.

Nor will she say any more about it—even when exasperatedly invited to by all concerned.

Rather, she’ll just stare back at them with these helpless, frightened eyes: seemingly unable to bring forth another word, lest—oh well, undoubtedly something or other.

Anyway, Gaim has decided that this might be a good time for him to go abroad in the land in search of that successor.

And why not—after all, the world has been under his absolute control now for nigh on a generation, while people couldn’t be happier!

He’s even thinking about having a temple built to house an effigy of Our Lady of Mercy, a new deity whose popularity was gaining among the miserable and heartbroken.

And then, should anyone find themselves unable to afford all the offerings that were now called for around here, why, they’d now come upon Our Lady of Charity; who was now receiving donations from people, especially the wealthier ones, hoping to participate at least a little in all this ‘succoring’ business and who’d accordingly never turn anyone away from the Ultimate Nipple of it all feeling hungry, dirty, tired, sick, or stupid—much less divinely abandoned.

So what could possibly go wrong?


And well, he did appear to have everything pretty well covered; while the Child himself would have had plenty of reason to be happy, as indicated by his supportive lineup below.

_________________________

  • Abeona: ancient Roman deity who protected children the first time they left their parents’ home alone
  • Abuk: Sudanese deity of gardens
  • Adeona: ancient Roman deity who guided children back to their parents’ home after school
  • Aedos: ancient Roman deity of modesty, reverence, and respect
  • Ahnt kai: Mexican protectress of women and children
  • Asa Poorna: Chohan Indian deity of happiness
  • Asherat: Phoenecian deity of marital fidelity
  • Ashis: Hindu Indian deity of happiness
  • Asvayujau: Hindu Indian deity of good luck, joy, and happiness
  • Autyeb: ancient Egyptian deity of happiness
  • Baalat: Phoenecian queen of all their deities, partial to books, libraries and writers
  • Blid: Norse deity of happiness
  • Boldogåśśzony: Hungarian deity who protects women and children
  • Caireen: ancient Irish protector of mothers and their children
  • Chie: Chibcha Ecuadorian fun-loving deity
  • Chinnintamma: Indian deity of households
  • Chunda: Buddhist deity of happiness
  • Copia: ancient Roman deity of prosperity
  • Cunina: ancient Roman deity who protects infants still in the cradle
  • Devananda: Jain Indian deity of happiness
  • Diwali: Hindu deity of happiness and merriment
  • Dorje Naljorma: Tibetan deity of happiness
  • Ekajata: Buddhist deity of good fortune and happiness
  • Eutychia: ancient Greek deity of good fortune
  • Fand: Celtic deity of happiness and pleasure
  • Fortuna: ancient Roman deity of good fortune
  • Garmangabis: Suebi ancient German deity of prosperity
  • Gauri: Hindu Indian deity of marital happiness/longevity
  • Gwen: Celtic deity of happiness said to be so beautiful that anyone looking at her too long would die
  • Holi: Indian deity of happiness and merriment
  • Koros: ancient Greek deity of exuberance
  • Kubjika: Hindu deity of writing
  • Kypala: Slavic deity of long life
  • Lada: Slavic deity of love and happiness
  • Lamaria: Svan Caucasus Region deity of fertility, childbirth, the hearth, as well as the protectress of women and children
  • Lennaxidaq: Kwakiutl deity of good luck and wealth
  • Liberalitas: ancient Roman deity of generosity
  • Linksmine: Slavic deity of good cheer
  • Moneta: ancient Roman deity of prosperity
  • Nanse: Babylonian deity of social justice who turned no one away as long as they were worthy of her help: special deity of widows, orphans and the poor
  • Neith: ancient Egyptian deity of women, the home, spinning, weaving, hunting, and war
  • Nu She: Chinese deity of literacy
  • Nu Wa: Chinese deity who arranges marriages
  • Oboto: African deity of serenity
  • Oki-Tsu-Hime-No-Kami: Japanese deity of kitchens
  • Ot: Mongolian deity who protects marriages
  • Pietas: ancient Roman deity of piety and duty to the state and family
  • Re’are’a: Tahitian deity of happiness
  • Sefkhet-Abwy: ancient Egyptian deity of writing and libraries
  • Suklang Malayon: Philippine protectress of happy homes
  • Svasti: Hindu deity of the home
  • Tenye Te’en: Nigerian deity of marital fidelity
  • Tonantzin: Aztec deity of motherhood
  • Tranquillitas Vacuna: ancient Roman deity who presided over doing absolutely nothing
  • Tsho gyalma: Tibetan deity of happiness
  • Tsilah: Hatian deity of beauty and good fortune
  • Tui: Chinese deity of happiness
  • Verplaca: ancient Roman deity of family harmony
  • Volumna: ancient Roman deity of the nursery
  • Vor: Norse deity of betrothals and marriages
  • Wopeh: Lakota deity of pleasure and happiness
  • Yingxi Niang: Chinese deity of happinessu
  • Ziva: Etruscan deity of long life

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